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20130129
20130206
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and using more clean energy. the mainland government is looking to that similar long- term measures. it has a identified 90 he cites as smart cities, environmentally friendly zones created using the latest technology. that is expected to take another 3-5 years. one businessman took to the streets giving out cans of fresh air that was collected in less polluted parts of the country. >> still to come, sudan's sporting passion. tough economic times do not stop people from getting to the horse races. >> find out how the subway system in moscow is being expanded. >> we have lots of unsettled weather with us across the middle east. on the satellite picture, we see a cloud of cold air. we have a huge blanket of cold air going into iran. even toward the west, it is on subtle. in the next couple of days, these systems will run their way east. the heavier downpours will be pushing away toward the east. they are making their way into parts of afghanistan. the wet weather will stretch through parts of iran. some of the downpours are likely to be heavy. just the tail end of the system affecting us furth
malnutrition, the mortality of this disease, depending on the variation of protein energy malnutrition that we see, can be as high as 30 to 50%. usually the children die from routine infections like diarrhea or pneumonia. in fact, pneumonia is the most common cause of death. children who are severely malnourished appear anorexic. they do not want to eat. they're often very depressed. their heads are low. they stop talking. they stop walking, and they're severely dehydrated and suffering from infectious diseases. perhaps the most extreme case of malnutrition the team witnessed was annis-- a tiny wisp of a girl, two and a half years old. annis is just skin and bones and a head. and i looked at her, and i looked at the weight, and i asked the mother how old she is and the mother told me. and i said, "it's not possible." so i took annis myself back to weigh. i saw the scale, it said 4.2 kilos, took annis off, measured her height, put her back on the scale. i still couldn't believe it. it was amazing to me that annis was still alive. the highest mortality for children so severely malnourished occur
's biggest energy companies. they accuse shell of polluting fish ponds and damaging their croup's--crops -- crops. in a moment, we will speak live to our correspondent. first, let's hear from simon mcgregor-wood him outside the court in the hague -- simon mcgregor-wood, outside the court in the hague. >> it is not a complicated verdict. there were five cases being brought against shell. the judge decided that shell was only liable for one of the five. in that case, shell, the company in nigeria, could have done more to prevent the sabotage of a pipeline, which was then the cause of terrible pollution in one of the villages. happiness for those villagers, but disappointment for the villagers in the other cases. i'm joined by the lawyer who represented the four nigerian farmers and dutch friends of the earth. thank you very much for joining us. a mixed verdict. are you disappointed with it? >> no, i would not say that. it could have been better. overall, it is quite a good outcome for us. at least show was held liable in one of the cases. that is a good start -- at was held liable
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the idea how energy relates to these things. it's the knowing how hot-- how much energy is gonna flow. and we get that idea. we make these distinctions. you guys know when you go on the top of the mountains, it's cold up there. but you're closer to the sun, right? in the top of the mountains, it's cold. and somebody say, "hey, how come it's so cold up here?" so--we're closer to the sun. wait, no, no, no. that should make us hotter. you guys know when you're approaching the sun, it gets hotter and hotter, don't you? have you known that? i mean, you can get in the best ceramic materials that the humans can make. you get within a million miles of that sun. honey, you're gonna fry to a crisp, a million miles from the sun, unless you go at nighttime. [laughter] hey, but the point, back again, you're up at the top of the hill and it's cool up there. and you know what you can tell your friends? hey, gang, you know why it's so cool up here? because warm air rises. let me ask you a question, does warm air rise? you guys know about that from before? did you guys know that you get in the top of
harnessing all other kinds of energy. during that long block of time from a couple of million years ago until the industrial revolution, there was a point about 10,000 years ago when human beings began to farm, began to practice agriculture, and that harnessed a lot more energy than was possible by just hunting and gathering wild resources. keach: in the old world, we know that agriculture sparked the development of the world's first cities in places like sumer in ancient mesopotamia. but how did farming begin in the new world ? when scotty macneish first came to the tehuacan valley in 1962, he was seeking the answer to one simple question -- did agriculture evolve here or was it introduced from the old world ? then we'll measure out from the corners. keach: in a stratum of the purron cave that had been laid down thousands of years later than those in which he found the hunters and gatherers, macneish made a discovery that exceeded all expectations. macneish: this is a corn cob, and it's a real little one. keach: it may have looked insignificant, but the shriveled ear dated to about 5000 b.c.
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6